I Dare You to Say These 3 Words to Your Doctor

--Today we have a dare for you. We want you to tell your doctor three words next time you see him.

Double-dog dare.

I’ll tell you what these 3 words are in a moment.

Before I go there, though, here’s our quick wrap-up insights from our time at the annual anarchist’s ball Anarchapulco.

It sounds cliche at this point, but people are waking up. Everywhere.

Incredibly, we met liberty-minded people from every end of the Earth in a small city in Mexico. With no age range unaccounted for.

It’s clear as day…

Liberty is certainly still a minority. But it’s a minority that’s growing in size and, even more important, in depth.
So, here’s what we’ve learned.

The world is changing rapidly. And we are being forced to change with it. Now, this doesn’t mean you have to work yourself to the bone or spend 14 hours a day doing obsessive research to “figure it out.” Actually, it’s the opposite. You’re being called to drop the bullshh…

I mean…

Let go of those things in your life that aren’t working, and move toward those things in your life that work really well.

“Follow your bliss,” Joseph Campbell once wrote.

What does this mean, exactly? It means living by example. It means making liberty more than an intellectual exercise. It means making freedom a lifestyle.

We must learn to grow as individuals and live as a planet. To live with ourselves and others authentically. To be aware… present. To be free from tyranny. And, most important, to be free from the fear of tyranny.

“I must not fear,” Frank Herbert wrote in Dune. “Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past, I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone, there will be nothing.

“Only I will remain.”

And now, after that bit of light reading, let’s talk about those three words.

--To begin, let’s take what Anna Norlander, a Swede told Sveriges Radio last Friday:

“It’s quicker to get a colleague back to work if you have an operation in two weeks’ time rather than having to wait for a year. It’s terrible that I, as a young person, don’t feel I can trust the health care system to take care of me.”

Anna is part of a growing trend of Swedes getting privately-funded health insurance from their employers.

That’s right. Bernie’s poster-boy socialist’s dream health system is headed down the tubes.

According to Sweden’s insurance trade industry organization, Svensk Forsakring: “The number of private health care insurance policies has increased in recent years. In 2011, about 440,000 people had private health care insurance. Most of these people have their policy paid by their employer.”

Why did they move to private insurance? Here’s one reason: “Visitors are sometimes surprised to learn about year-long waiting times for cancer patients.”

“This is an unfortunate reality,” Chris Johncox writes in the Libertarian Republic, “in an industry where suppliers cannot predict market prices for a service and therefore must ration, causing poor service and over-inflated demand.”

“When leftists fantasize about Northern Europe, the first thing they think of is the region’s enormous public spending and its overly generous welfare state. However, as with all dreams, the time is coing to wake up. Along with several other social services, Sweden’s iconic ‘free’ healthcare system’s days are numbered.”

The days for America’s healthcare system, as it stands, are numbered, too.

These days, the politicos are standing on the side of the road with a sign that reads: SINGLE-PAYER OR BUST.

But, as we have said, this is not a time for fear.

It’s a time to look at the issue with a clear mind. It’s time to uncover the solutions that are cropping up to subvert the increasingly cost-prohibitive public “sick care.”

Today, we’ve invited Jud Anglin to give you a little kickstart.

Jud, if you don’t know, is an affordable healthcare solutions strategist and the founder of the first Medical Tourism company in the U.S., MedRetreat.

Below, Jud dares you to say three words to your doctor. The three words you’ll learn in a moment offer a simple solution to saving hundreds on your medical bill.

Keep your eyes peeled for your issues of Laissez Faire Letter for even better solutions on hacking the healthcare system and much more.

Read on…

I Dare You to Say These 3 Words to Your Doctor

By Jud Anglin

With skyrocketing health insurance premiums and deductibles, you’re likely thinking about cost-effective medical treatments in case of emergencies.

Here is one that is gaining serious traction and I urge you to try.

Not only does it work, but it is ridiculously simple… in fact all you have to do is say three simple words to save potentially hundreds!

The words… “CASH PAY PATIENT"

Need proof?

Try this on…

Recently my 13 year old son hurt his right ankle during soccer practice.

Unable to walk, I drove him to the closest urgent care center for an exam.

As a member of Liberty Health Share, I recalled that I have to announce that I’m a cash pay patient.

After waiting in the lobby for about 15 minutes a nurse called us back and wanted to take an X-Ray.

I immediately told her that I was a “cash pay” patient and asked how much it would cost. She had to look at her computer screen fist and then told me that it would cost $109. Thirty minutes later a doctor came to our waiting room with good news. “Nothing torn or broken. Just tendonitis, and will heal with a week of rest."

The doctor then recommended crutches. Again, I asked, "how much… I’m cash pay?" His first reaction was one of concern. He told me that the crutches would set me back a little over $300. Noticing my anguished expression, he retorted, "let me check something here on my computer.”

After a few clicks, he said, "hold on here, I can actually get those down to $96 and I’ll reduce my fee on top of that.” My total charge was $204. The math didn’t add up. Not until I got my itemized bill (see below) did I see all the discounts for simply informing everyone in the process that I was a cash pay patient.

There was even a line item credit listed as Self Pay Cash Discount in amount of $45.00. Had I not informed everyone that I was a cash pay patient, I’m certain that bill would have been over $500.

Next time you need medical treatment of any kind, make sure to remember these 3 simple words…

…cash pay patient.!

Regards,

Jud Anglin
for, Laissez Faire Club

Chris Campbell

Written By Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell is the Managing editor of Laissez Faire Today. Before joining Agora Financial, he was a researcher and contributor to SilverDoctors.com.